Most COVID patients have ongoing symptoms

Henrietta Strickland
January 13, 2021

This new research engaged more than 1,700 COVID-19 patients discharged from Wuhan-based Jinyintan Hospital from January 2019 to May 2019.

It is unclear how many COVID-19 patients suffer from "long-COVID" as some researchers are calling the long-lasting symptoms, but a United Kingdom study conducted last August stated that about 10% of COVID-19 patients keep suffering from chronic symptoms months after their original diagnosis. Fatigue or muscle weakness was reported by 63 per cent, while 26 per cent had sleep problems.

As for dealing with anxiety or depression, which was reported among 23 percent of patients in the study, Huang suggested psychological therapy including counseling, as these mental issues may be the result of the neurological effects of the disease as well as societal misunderstanding and stigmatization. Longer follow-up studies on larger populations are required to understand the full spectrum of effects that COVID-19 can have on people, says, scientists.

Understanding the long-lasting effects of COVID-19 on patients, even those who experienced mild symptoms, remains crucial to planning the healthcare system response in countries all over the world.

The study noted that hospitalised patients who were severely ill more often had impaired lung function and abnormalities detected in chest imaging - which the scientists believe could indicate organ damage six months after symptom onset. A King's College study, which has not been reviewed, also stated that nearly 100 out of 4,000 COVID-19 patients didn't recover from the illness three months after they started experiencing symptoms. These patients also underwent physical examination, lab tests and a six-minute walking test to evaluate their endurance levels.

Fred Pelzman, an associate medical director of Weill Cornell Internal Medicine Associates, a hospital in NY that was not involved in the study, said the experience of patients in China is similar to what has been seen in the US.

Home News Irish News Irish woman who contracted COVID last October rushed to hospital after developing blood clots By Aoibhin Bryant- 11/01/2021
Home News Irish News Irish woman who contracted COVID last October rushed to hospital after developing blood clots By Aoibhin Bryant- 11/01/2021

The study found that 76 per cent of patients who participated in the follow-up (1,265 of 1,655) said they still had symptoms.

After multivariable adjustment, patients showed an odds ratio (OR) 1.61 (95% CI 0.80-3.25) for scale 4 versus scale 3 and 4.60 (1.85-11.48) for scale 5-6 versus scale 3 for diffusion impairment; OR 0.88 (0.66-1.17) for scale 4 versus scale 3 and OR 1.77 (1.05-2.97) for scale 5-6 versus scale 3 for anxiety or depression, and OR 0.74 (0.58-0.96) for scale 4 versus scale 3 and 2.69 (1.46-4.96) for scale 5-6 versus scale 3 for fatigue or muscle weakness.

In a group of 94 patients, levels of these antibodies fell by an average of 53% during the six-month study period after their sickness peaked.

The short-term health effects and symptoms of Covid-19 are well-understood. About 350 patients were tested for lung function and had chest CT scans and ultrasounds.

According to a recent study in The Lancet journal, many Covid positive patients admitted in hospital for treatment have at least one existing symptom after six months of becoming infected with the virus.

Other reports by Click Lancashire

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER