I'm A Celebrity: Calls for police to investigate bug use

Lawrence Kim
Ноября 26, 2020

In response, an ITV spokesperson insisted that the bugs are "only ever released in a contained area and collected immediately after filming", adding: "They are all purchased commercially within the United Kingdom and are normally bred as animal food".

ITV has apparently said that the insects used on the game show were non-invasive, but declined to comment on which actual species were used for filming.

Wales' First Minister has waded into the controversy over the use of non-native wildlife on I'm A Celebrity...

Presenters Ante and Dis were included in a number of negative tweets about the December Saturday show, and by picking it up on the chin they addressed the response from the right as soon as they returned to host the live show on Sunday.

The I'm A Celebrity bosses have defended the use of wildlife for the trials.

He said that "viewers will have seen the stories from Denmark recently about mink and coronavirus crossing species".

"We have a long working relationship with the RSPCA in New South Wales, Australia, and as such contacted their counterparts some months ago when we knew that the programme would be made in the United Kingdom, with a view to working collaboratively with them".

"Looking ahead to next year, of course, we look forward very much to being able to welcome people back here to Wales". The current season is being filmed there, rather than the series' typical setting of the Australian jungle.

A North Wales Police statement said: "North Wales Police and Natural Resources Wales have received information regarding the potential release of non-native species into "non studio" areas, and we have given suitable advice to the production team regarding their set management and biosecurity".

"All of the insects used on I'm A Celebrity are non-invasive species".

"They are only ever released in a contained area and collected immediately after filming".

The statement further said, "they are all purchased commercially within the United Kingdom and are normally bred as animal food".

Celebrities including athlete Sir Mo Farah, TV presenter Vernon Kay and journalist Victoria Derbyshire are among the famous faces taking part in this series of the programme.

The concern is that the show's use of non-native cockroaches, maggots, spiders and worms in challenges meant to gross out - and weed out - contestants could threaten wildlife in the 250-acre estate surrounding Gwrych Castle in north Wales.

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