Snakes can glide through the air -- and this is how

James Marshall
July 1, 2020

For some the sight of a snake slithering on the ground is scary enough, so how about one launching itself through the air?

"This work demonstrates that aerial undulation in snakes serves a different function than known uses of undulation in other animals, and suggests a new template of control for dynamic flying robots", the scientists conclude in their paper's abstract.

For their investigate revealed in the journal Character Physics, experts from Virginia Tech set motion-seize tags on seven snakes and filmed them with superior-pace cameras as the snakes flew across a four-story high theater.

Gurus say the snakes glide through the air and study direct author Isaac Yeaton advised CNN the crew established out to recognize how they do so.

Traveling snakes are equipped to undulate their bodies as they glide by means of the air, and these special movements allow them to choose flight, researchers have uncovered.

According to the report, study author Jake Socha has been studying the snakes for around 20 years.

"This work demonstrates that aerial undulation in snakes serves a unique objective than recognized uses of undulation in other animals, and implies a new template of command for dynamic flying robots", the scientists conclude in their paper's abstract.

The snakes also spread their ribs, giving them greater wind resistance.

Their product components in frequencies of undulating waves, their course, forces acting on the body, and mass distribution.

"You don't strictly need to undulate to fall, so that leads to the question 'well then why are they undulating, '" said Yeaton.

According to one hypothesis, it was a base motor pattern for snakes built in over millions of years.

The report said the researchers at Virginia Tech carried out indoor experiments with live snakes and also developed a computational model. "It truly is a big phase ahead", stated Yeaton.

What's the next stage of the study?

He told CNN that snakes are "question-generating organisms" and that there are many more mysteries to solve.

The report quoted Yeaton: "As soon as you watch it you're like 'how does it do that?'" he said.

"As quickly as you look at it you might be like 'how does it do that?'" mentioned Yeaton, who extra that this could be why so quite a few persons are frightened of the reptiles. "Then the notion that this animal can then fly is pretty unsettling to men and women".

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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