Chinese Theme Park Faces Backlash For Forcing Pig To Bungee Jump

Elias Hubbard
January 21, 2020

The stunt caused anger online - reflecting the growing importance of animal rights among China's population.

The park, in the south-western region of Chongqing, tried to justify the stunt by explaining it was meant to promote the first day of its bungee attraction.

A Chinese theme park forced a live pig to wear a cape and "bungee jump" off a platform as part of a stunt that aimed to attract more visitors.

The publicity event happened on the weekend at the Meixin Red Wine Town theme park, with it reportedly being dubbed the "golden pig bungee jump", the BBC reported.

There is conflicting information about the fate of the pig, with some local media outlets reporting the animal was destined for the slaughterhouse.

According to the publication, the park, located in the Chongqing municipality, released an apologetic statement shortly after receiving heavy criticism from Weibo users.

The newspaper itself took to Weibo to criticise the incident, saying while "the pig is OK" the "people [behind the stunt] are not".

"We sincerely accept netizens' criticism and advice and apologize to the public", it said. "We will improve [our] marketing of the tourist site, to provide tourists with better services".

"A bungee jump is a scary experience even for consenting humans - just imagine the outright terror of being forcibly strung up by your legs and thrown from a high platform", Jason Baker, PETA senior vice president of worldwide campaigns, told Daily Mail.

"A bungee jump is a scary experience even for consenting humans - just imagine the outright terror of being forcibly strung up by your legs and thrown from a high platform". According to ABC News, the pig was seen lying semi-conscious on the platform below before it was dragged away.

In a separate statement to BBC News, Baker added that "pigs experience pain and fear in the same ways that we do, and this disgusting PR stunt should be illegal".

Animal protection laws are not in place in China but hundreds of grassroots organisations have sprung up in the country in recent years to campaign for animal welfare, such as Freedom for Animal Actors (FAA), according to Animals Asia, a Hong Kong-based worldwide animal charity, which has been supporting FAA for several years. "We let the pig make the first jump because pork prices have been very high this year and recently they dropped a bit", the facility's owner told local media Thecover.cn. But they need help.

"The Chinese public's angry response should be a wake-up call to China's policy-makers to implement animal protection laws immediately".

A protest that year was held by members of Freedom for Animal Actors (FAA) outside of the Beijing Workers' Stadium.

"Killing animals for consumption and treating them cruelly for entertainment are two different things", another said.

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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