Senate Republicans Are Ready to Repeal Obamacare

Henrietta Strickland
June 26, 2017

Trump made the admission during a Fox News interview when he fielded a question about former President Barack Obama's response to the bill. The Times also reports that Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska is on the fence, despite specific provisions in the bill meant to benefit her state.

Other Republicans in the Senate are reserving their complete support, saying they require more time to digest the 142-page bill and consider its implications.

Lynch said the shift in Medicaid funding - from 50-50 state and federal funding to roughly 70 percent funded by states - will be particularly devastating to states that took advantage of Obamacare's Medicaid expansion in recent years, including MA, saying: "Medicaid expansion, that'll kill MA".

It's no secret that the Affordable Care Act has flaws, but Sen.

Republican Sen. Susan Collins of ME said she has extreme reservations about the Senate healthcare bill. We don't have too much of a choice because the alternative is the dead carcass of Obamacare.I don't think they're that far off.

The Senate health care bill created to replace the Affordable Care Act has drawn criticism from conservative Republican lawmakers who say the measure does not go far enough to repeal Obamacare.

Sen. Chuck Schumer, deeming his fight a matter of "life and death", vowed Friday "to use every single ounce of energy that I have" to defeat the Republican health care bill to repeal Obamacare. Joseph Lieberman (I-CT) and Collins discussed the release of a report that says that less than one percent of the 4,000-mile U.S. The bill would also cut taxes for high-income Americans. Republicans argue that the bill rolls back penalties for Americans that choose not to purchase a health insurance plan. It is believed the president wants to see a more generous bill pass through the Senate. Ted Cruz of Texas, Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, Mike Lee of Utah and Rand Paul of Kentucky have said they are "not yet ready" to support the plan, although they are willing to negotiate changes that could get their backing. However, "as now drafted, this bill does not do almost enough to lower premiums".

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has estimated that the House version of bill would leave 23 million people uninsured. He said that the new plan will give Americans less comprehensive health care coverage and estimates that the bill will increase deductibles, defund Planned Parenthood, impose a "crushing age tax" on middle age Americans, and rollback safeguards to prevent lifetime insurance limits.

Other reports by Click Lancashire

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER