What are Sudanese protesters demanding?

Elias Hubbard
April 16, 2019

On Thursday, the Sudanese army ousted longtime President Omar al-Bashir, who ruled Sudan since 1989, following months of popular protests against his rule.

Troops had gathered on three sides of the sit-in and tractors were preparing to remove stone and metal barricades, but protesters joined hands and formed rings around the sit-in area to prevent them.

Fearing that the core of the old establishment is far from gone, the Sudanese Professionals Association (SPA) on Monday reiterated its call for the military council to be dissolved and substituted by a civilian one that will only include "limited" army representation.

"We call on our people to come immediately to the sit-in area to protect our revolution".

"It is time for the transitional military council and all other parties to enter into an inclusive dialogue to effect a transition to civilian rule", they said.

Britain's ambassador to Sudan, Irfan Siddiq, said he had met the deputy head of the transitional military council, Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, and had "asked for clarity on whereabouts of former President Bashir and other senior former regime figures".

The SPA has demanded the immediate handover of power to a civilian transitional government and the prosecution of former officials. It has also called on the opposition to pick the next prime minister.

The deputy leader of Sudan's ruling military council, Lt. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan Daqlo, met in Khartoum on Sunday with US charge d'affaires Steven Koutsis.

A 10-member delegation representing the protesters delivered their demands during talks with the council late on Saturday, according to a statement by the Alliance for Freedom and Change umbrella group spearheading the rallies.

The deputy leader also told the United States envoy how the military council would "preserve the security and stability of the country".

The foreign ministry urged the worldwide community to back the military council "to achieve the Sudanese goal of democratic transition".

Barely 24 hours later, the military council was forced to appoint its second leader in two days, with Lieutenant General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan replacing Ibn Auf.

"The key demand is the formation of a civil council to guarantee that the revolution is safeguarded and all the goals are achieved".

Himeidti is a field commander for the Rapid Support Forces (RSF) counter-insurgency unit, which rights groups have accused of abuses in the war-torn Darfur region.

An end to the state of emergency Bashir imposed on February 22.

The SPA also demanded the confiscation of properties belonging to al-Bashir's National Congress Party and the release of soldiers who sided with their "revolution".

Other reports by Click Lancashire

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER