Ecuador spread lies about WikiLeaks founder - Julian Assange's lawyer

Elias Hubbard
April 15, 2019

A photo of Ecuadorian President Lenín Moreno lounging in bed with a giant platter of lobster in front of him may have spurred Julian Assange's eviction from the country's London embassy.

Lenin Moreno also said that no other country had an influence over the decision to revoke the WikiLeaks founder's asylum, which the leader claimed followed repeated violations by Assange.

New footage has surfaced of the 47-year-old messing around with a skateboard during his time in the Ecuadorian embassy in London.

"And to suggest that someone would choose to remain in there without legitimate concerns about U.S. extradition, which is exactly what was proven this week, I think people can't really understand what it would be like to live in a room like that for a very long time". "It is unfortunate that, from our territory and with the permission of authorities of the previous government, facilities have been provided within the Ecuadorian embassy in London to interfere in processes of other states".

He told The Guardian: "We can not allow our house, the house that opened its doors, to become a centre for spying".

Assange's relationship with his hosts collapsed after Ecuador accused him of leaking information about Moreno's personal life. Assange had been confined to the embassy building for the past seven years, having violated his bail conditions in order to demand asylum over fears he could be extradited to Sweden following allegations of sexual assault. "Our decision is not arbitrary but is based on global law".

The president also made references to Assange's apparently poor hygiene following allegations made by Ecuador's interior minister, Maria Paula Romo.

Assange is now in custody in London while Swedish officials weigh up whether to reopen an investigation into rape allegations against him.

One particularly controversial piece, consisting of gun camera footage leaked to Assange's organization by former US army soldier Chelsea Manning, appears to show US Apache gunships firing on civilians in Iraq in 2007.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has joined Assange's supporters in saying he should be protected against extradition to the U.S. because he exposed evidence of "atrocities" in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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