Labour to push for 'meaningful vote' on Brexit deal

Marco Green
February 10, 2019

"I'm certain of one thing, is that it's not going to be as good as if they had not been Brexit, that is for sure", Lagarde said.

Housing minister James Brokenshire confirmed May's plans to the BBC: "The government will commit that the meaningful vote - the deal coming back - has not happened by 27 February, then we will allow a further motion, voteable in parliament, to take place, to give that sense of assurance as to the process moving forward".

Britain is due to leave the European Union on March 29, but parliament has rejected May's divorce deal, leaving the prime minister to seek changes from a resistant EU.

When asked if a meaningful vote would happen this month, he said: "If it has not happened, parliament would have further opportunity by no later than 27 February".

Brexit minister Stephen Barclay will meet European Union negotiator Michel Barnier on Monday to discuss changes to the part of the exit deal relating to the "backstop", an insurance policy against the return of a hard border between European Union member Ireland and British-ruled Northern Ireland.

He acknowledged that more work was needed to get the United Kingdom ready for Brexit on March 29, telling the BBC's Andrew Marr Show there are "still steps that are currently being put in place" but "there is steady work that is going on, 10,000 civil servants that are now focused on this" and the Border Force was "ramping up" its staff.

He accused May of "pretending to make progress" over issues such as the Irish border so she could "run down the clock" to force MPs to choose between her deal and no deal.

Sir Keir earlier said his plan was necessary to put a "hard stop" to Mrs May "running down the clock" before the March 29 deadline.

In his letter to Mrs May, the Labour leader set out five demands, including a permanent customs union and close alignment with the single market.

Deputy Labour leader Tom Watson told the Andrew Marr Show that if those conditions were not met then his party could move to supporting a second referendum.

"It would be economically very, very unsafe for Britain, and for the peace process in Ireland it would potentially be devastating, ' he told Sky News" Sophy Ridge On Sunday.

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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