Pink Wave: Women to Flood Congress After Historic Election Night

Elias Hubbard
November 8, 2018

Ocasio-Cortez could lose her title of the youngest woman elected to Congress in a matter of hours.

Almost two years after women spilled out into the streets of Washington and in cities across the country in defiance of the inauguration of President Donald Trump, the United States is sending more women than ever before to the House of Representatives. The first ever openly LGBT governor, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, a bisexual woman, won her re-election bid Tuesday as well.

Women are also harder working.

Most of the women who won were Democrats who helped the party capture a majority in the House.

Texas is set to send its first Hispanic women to Congress, as Democrats Veronica Escobar and Sylvia Garcia both won their races. Others, like Massachusetts' Ayanna Pressley, were political veterans. The first-time candidate, of Puerto Rican heritage, said in her victory speech: "Today is a milestone, but it's really a beginning, it truly is a beginning..." "The first role of women as military flyers was during World War II as Women Airforce Service Pilots, an organization disbanded after the war", Colonel McSally said. Men were more evenly divided in their vote.

A "pink wave" is sending a record number of women to Congress, with more than 110 claiming victory in their House and Senate races-with some contests too close yet to call.

Twenty-nine-year-old Democratic Socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has become the youngest woman ever elected to Congress. Ocasio-Cortez rose to national prominence in June, when she unseated 10-term incumbent Representative Joe Crowley, the fourth-ranking Democrat in the House.

At least 99 women will represent Americans in the House, surpassing the previous record of 84.

Democrat Ilhan Omar will serve as the nation's first Somali-American Congresswoman.

While notable Republican successes include the first female senator elected from Tennessee and the first female governor of South Dakota, there are concerns that the overt Democrat disparity could fan the partisan divide.

Young women made their voices heard, as well, with two-thirds of voters younger than 30 voting for Democrats for Congress, compared with 32 per cent who voted for Republicans, according to exit polls.

Another important trend from this year's exits (and any year's) is how gender interacts with race and education.

"Thanks to you, tomorrow will be a new day in America", Nancy Pelosi, House Democratic leader, said. Several were first-time candidates.

From Florida to New Mexico, these candidates brought platforms that stood for a range of issues such as affordable health care, gun safety and climate change.

On Tuesday night Democrats won control of the House, delivering a major blow to Trump in the first election since he became president in 2016.

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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