Sayuz rocket: 'Faulty sensor' led to launch failure

James Marshall
November 1, 2018

Although the official report on the cause of a Soyuz rocket failure won't be released until Thursday, a Russian official disclosed its central conclusion a day early, the country's news agency TASS reports.

A Russian cosmonaut and USA astronaut were forced to abort their mission on October 11 and perform an emergency landing after a launch accident that Roscomos said was caused by a faulty sensor.

A Russian cosmonaut and USA astronaut were forced to abort their mission on October 11 after a rocket bound for the International Space Station failed, sending them plunging back to Earth in an emergency landing.

The Canadian Space Agency said it is still awaiting confirmation of details regarding Saint-Jacques' mission.

In the aborted mission, a space capsule carrying a two-man Russian-American crew malfunctioned after liftoff and landed safely in Kazakhstan.

Russian rockets are manufactured in Russia and then transported by rail to the Russia-leased Baikonur cosmodrome.

The incident, on 11 October, was the first serious launch problem by a manned Soyuz space mission since 1983. More recently, Russia's space program has been dogged by a string of failed satellite launches involving unmanned vehicles.

It was the third launch of a Soyuz rocket from Russia's northern Plesetsk launch pad this year, the military said.

The crew is set to include Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques, who was originally scheduled to fly to the station December 20 on a six-month mission.

Russian Federation hopes to launch three crew for the International Space Station on December 3, the first manned blast-off since an accident this month, the Roscosmos space agency said Wednesday.

The current three-person crew aboard the space station may return home on December 20, Krikalyov was quoted as saying. Russian Federation stands to lose that monopoly with the arrival of SpaceX's Dragon and Boeing's Starliner crew capsules.

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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