Soyuz capsule makes emergency landing after booster failure, Russian media reports

James Marshall
October 12, 2018

But something went wrong minutes after liftoff, sending the Soyuz capsule into a ballistic re-entry, NASA officials said.

NASA said it has been informed by Russian space officials that the crew has made an emergency landing at an unspecified location in Kazakhstan and is in good condition. Most recently, a mysterious hole was detected on the Russian section of the ISS in August, and a Soyuz launch failure destroyed 18 satellites in November 2017. "Today showed again what an unbelievable vehicle the Soyuz is, to be able to save the crew from such a failure". "I strongly believe we're going to get the right answer to what caused the hole on the International Space Station and that together we'll be able to continue our strong collaboration", Bridenstine said, as reported by the Associated Press.

After the crew successfully navigated the failure and landed safely, they boarded a plane to fly back to the Baikonur Cosmodrome.

The politician has clashed with the USA, suggesting American astronauts should use trampolines instead of Russian rockets to reach the ISS after Washington imposed sanctions over Moscow's 2014 annexation of Crimea.

For now, the United States relies on Moscow to carry its astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) which was launched 20 years ago. The missions both hope to launch in 2019, though they have each experienced delays thus far.

These will be the first crewed missions to launch from American soil since 2011 and, while the issues with the Soyuz MS-10 mission will likely be resolved by then, this will allow for increased access to space and reduce dependency.

"An investigative group has been formed and officials are now examining the launch site, documents are being seized", the Investigative Committee said in a statement.

Roscosmos chief Dmitry Rogozin, who watched the launch together with NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, tweeted that a panel has been set up to investigate the cause of the booster failure. Everything had been going quite smoothly for Roscosmos ahead of the freakish hole discovered in one of their Soyuz spacecraft which was (and still is) attached to the International Space Station.

Thursday's failure was the first manned launch failure for the Russian space program since September 1983 when a Soyuz exploded on the launch pad.

"Teams have been in contact with the crew".

Those spacewalks had already been delayed after the Japanese cargo vehicle carrying the new batteries ran into a series of launch delays in September.

NASA TV begins its live broadcast Thursday at 3:30 a.m.as the crew counts down to its launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome.

Nasa says a booster failure forced the two crew to return to return to Earth in a "ballistic descent mode" - a sharper angle of landing compared to normal that put the pair under higher G-forces than normal.

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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