Public urinals rolled out in Paris

Elias Hubbard
August 14, 2018

But locals will be damned if they see the urinals remain, and are reportedly demanding their removal from the town hall, vowing to petition against them.

"There's no need to put something so immodest and ugly in such an historic spot", said Paola Pellizzari, 68, owner of a Venetian art store.

According to BBC, residents believe it is immodest and looks ugly in such an historic spot as it is beside the most lovely townhouse in the city, Hotel de Lauzun.

She feared the urinal, installed around 20 meters (22 yards) from a primary school, "incites exhibitionism".

Local mayor Ariel Weil heralded the urinals as "an invention of genius" but admitted on Tuesday that the particular installation on the Ile Saint-Louis will likely be moved several metres after complaints from locals.

One eco-friendly "urinoir" deemed to be particularly offensive is painted in letterbox red and topped with a flower-box in the chic neighbourhood of Île Saint-Louis, just a stones throw from Notre Dame.

"It's terrible", another resident said.

Each of the four bright red boxes has an opening at the front, and straw laden within, which apparently can be collected and used for compost for public parks.

The public "Uritrottoir" - a combination of the French words for urinal and pavement, have also stirred up concerns of discrimination, as it is only suitable for male use.

"We're told we have to accept this but this is absolutely unacceptable".

Earlier this month the city of Paris upgraded its existing 400 closed public toilets with more modern, free and accessible facilities, however it's understood a fifth Uritrottoir will be rolled out in the city soon. "If it is really bothering people, we will find another location".

Some have even branded their installation discriminatory.

In case they weren't already problematic enough, some have even described the urinals as discriminatory, with French feminist group Femmes Solidaires arguing that the public space has be transformed to suit the needs of 'men who can not control themselves'.

'The public space must be transformed to cause them minimum discomfort'.

"No one needs to urinate in the street", she added.

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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