Pope Francis makes surprise visit to children at pediatric hospital

Elias Hubbard
January 12, 2018

Pope Francis is urging worldwide efforts to rebuild trust on the Korean peninsula and in Syria, using his annual foreign policy address to press his demand that political leaders put the dignity of their people before war, profits or power. This move ran roughshod over United Nations' resolutions on the matter and Francis - stressing the city is "sacred to Christians, Jews and Muslims" - called for those agreements to be a respected through a commitment to keeping the "status quo" of the city.

POPE Francis today called for peaceful talks with North Korea and insisted: "All nuclear weapons must be banned".

"We give a gift pleasing to Jesus when we care for a sick person, spend time with a hard person, help someone for the sake of helping, or forgive someone who has hurt us", the pope said.

His comments came less than a week after Trump announced on Twitter that he has a "nuclear button", one that is bigger and more powerful than Kim's, on his desk "at all times".

Pope Francis urged concerted global efforts Monday to rebuild trust on the Korean peninsula and in Syria, using his annual foreign policy address to demand that political leaders put the dignity of their people before war, profit or power.

Quoting a document issued by Pope John XXIII at the height of the Cold War, Francis said: "Nuclear weapons must be banned".

Francis also addressed climate change, calling for countries to remain committed to the 2015 Paris accord on reducing carbon emissions.

Earlier this month, after North Korean leader Kim Jong Un asserted that he had a nuclear button at the ready, Trump tweeted that the US button was bigger and more powerful.

Bergoglio called for dialogue and negotiation to achieve or preserve peace in several regions and countries, like the Korean Peninsula, the Middle East and the Israeli-Palestine conflict, among others, and in that general context he mentioned Venezuela.

A key part of the Jesuit Pope's 5,000-word speech focussed on refugees, a key concern of this papacy, with Francis warning against the stirring up of "primal fears" about the subject.

He also appeared to take aim at a number of Trump's foreign policy decisions without explicitly mentioning the president. "Perhaps because the star was not eye-catching, did not shine any brighter than other stars", he said, noting that Jesus' star "does not dazzle or overwhelm, but gently invites".

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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