European Union takes Hungary to top court over crackdown 'aimed at George Soros'

James Marshall
December 7, 2017

The European Commission took the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland to the European Court of Justice Thursday over their failure to accept the required quotas for refugees.

A relocation plan was launched by the European Union in 2015 in response to a large influx of migrants and refugees.

The bloc, however, found the trio's response unsatisfactory, saying that "the three countries have given no indication that they will contribute to the implementation of the relocation decision".

Brussels warned Budapest in October that it would take the case to its top court if it did not take the necessary measures to comply.

The EU Commission launched infringement procedures against the three countries in June and twice demanded an explanation for the non-compliance.

He added that the system agreed two years ago was "nonsense" and only served to support the rising popularity of the continent's extremist parties.

However, the Czech Republic has accepted only 12 of the 2,000 asylum-seekers it had been designated, while Hungary and Poland have received none. Polish Foreign Minister Witold Waszczykowski said the government was not changing its policy on migrants.

The temporary emergency relocation scheme was established in two Council Decisions in September 2015 (Council Decision (EU) 2015/1523 and Council Decision (EU) 2015/1601), in which Member States committed to relocate persons in need of worldwide protection from Italy and Greece.

Budapest also faces legal action over university law.

Budapest faced a triple legal whammy from Brussels on Thursday, with the European Commission also taking Hungary to the ECJ over a crackdown on education and foreign-backed civil society groups that critics say targets USA billionaire George Soros.

Prime Minister Viktor Orban considers Soros a key political foe, mainly due to their diverging views on migration.

Under the European Union law, the Commission has the power to take legal action against a member state which is not respecting its obligations.

Hungary also caused controversy in June when it passed legislation forcing non-governmental organisations to declare themselves "foreign-funded".

The European Commission said that the laws on foreign non-governmental organisations "indirectly discriminate and disproportionately restrict donations from overseas to civil society organisations".

Other reports by Click Lancashire

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER