Three remain missing after US Navy aircraft crash

Elias Hubbard
November 24, 2017

A transport aircraft in the u.s. military crashed Wednesday in the Philippine sea, and 3 of the 11 people who were on board were still unaccounted for, according to a new balance sheet of the US Navy.

This accident comes at a time when important maneuvers naval japanese-american have been in progress since last Thursday near Okinawa, involving 14 000 us military, the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan as well as three destroyers lance-missiles the americans. Eight others were rescued shortly after the crash.

It says the ship was operating in the Philippine Sea when the crash occurred at 2:45 p.m. Japan time.

The search, which had covered more than 320 nautical miles by Thursday morning, was being aided by three destroyers and two helicopter carriers from the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force. Indeed, the Grumman C-2A Greyhound is a twin-engine, high-wing cargo aircraft, designed perform the COD mission to carry equipment, passengers (including occasional distinguished visitors) supplies and mail to and from U.S. Navy aircraft carriers, "ensuring victory at sea through logistics".

A spokesman quoted Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera as telling reporters Wednesday that the C-2 aircraft crashed into the Pacific about 150 kilometers (90 miles) northwest of Okinotorishima, a Japanese atoll.

The Navy said it had notified next of kin that the three sailors were "whereabouts unknown" but it would delay releasing their identities publicly for three days due to policy.

In August, the guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain and an oil tanker collided near the Singapore Strait, leaving 10 sailors dead.

President Donald Trump on Wednesday offered prayers and said he's paying attention to the search. The Reagan is home-ported at the USA naval base in Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture. Seven sailors died in June when the USS Fitzgerald and a container ship collided off Japan.

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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