Apple's $1 billion data centre gets Irish High Court green light

James Marshall
October 12, 2017

When the project was announced, Apple said it meant to spend €1.7 billion (£1.5 billion) on a data centre in Ireland and another in Denmark, with each one costing €850 million (£762 million).

Garry Connolly, Founder and President, Host in Ireland, told Data Economy: "We are delighted that the planning process has had a successful outcome for the Apple Data Hosting Centre in Galway".

Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar met Apple executives last month and said they had made clear their frustration with the planning and judicial delays and warned the process would color decisions that they might make about future investments. It also appeared that the majority of the local population was in favor, given the jobs and income the center would bring to the area.

Apple intends to use the data centre to store European user data from services such as iMessage, iTunes and the App store.

Paul Keane, from the Apple for Athenry Facebook group which has campaigned to allow the tech giant to build its data centre there, described the decision as "great news". The Danish site is understood to be already up and running.

A decision on Apple's Irish data centre was expected to be passed in July but a shortage of High Court judges pushed the verdict back to October.

Apple was given the go-ahead to proceed with the development by Galway County Council in February 2015.

Following oral hearings the planning authority confirmed the permission in August of a year ago.

The case will return to the courts on Monday, where it will be decided whether or not a further appeal can be made against Apple.

A number of local residents challenged An Bord Pleanála's decision amid concerns it hadn't carried out the necessary environmental assessment. This prompted 2,000 local people from Athenry to march in support of the data centre past year.

Apple did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment.

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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