UAE denies reports on hacking Qatari state media

Elias Hubbard
July 18, 2017

Qatar said those reports were fabricated and posted by hackers, though it hasn't identified the source. The QNA (Qatar News Agency) hack led to a major regional upheaval, straining Qatar's relations with its neighbours.

The Washington Post reported that USA intelligence officials learned last week of newly analysed information that showed that senior UAE government officials discussed the planned hacking on May 23, the day before it occurred.

Read the whole story from The Washington Post.

The Washington Post reported that U.S. intelligence officials learned last week of newly analysed information that showed that senior UAE government officials discussed the planned hacking on May 23, the day before it occurred.

The UAE Foreign Minister Anwar Gargash also denied any hacking of Qatari websites.

Qatar accused the United Arab Emirates on Monday of violating worldwide law after reports suggested Abu Dhabi orchestrated the hacking of the Qatari official news agency and social media sites. Also, it was not clear if the UAE contracted some agency for the hack or carried out the hack itself.

The Washington Post cited USA intelligence officials as saying the UAE had orchestrated the posting of incendiary quotes attributed to Qatar's emir that he insisted were fabricated.

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"The UAE had no role whatsoever in the alleged hacking described in the article", UAE ambassador to Washington Yousef al-Otaiba said in a statement.

Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Egypt and Bahrain cut diplomatic and transport ties with Qatar on June 5, accusing it of supporting terrorism, a claim which Qatar denies.

In the articles, Qatar's Emir Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani was quoted as cautioning against confrontation with Iran, as well as defending the Palestinian group Hamas and Hezbollah, a Lebanese Shia movement allied with Tehran.

"What is true is Qatar's behaviour". Funding, supporting, and enabling extremists from the Taliban to Hamas and Qadafi [the former Libyan leader].

"What we know now is that Qatar is admitting that the list is worthy, that the list needs to be looked at, and that they need to change some of their laws to ensure that there is a proper process to cover this list", he said.

The FBI was previously known to be working with Qatar to investigate the hacking.

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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