Cassidy still undecided on health care bill, he tells Face the Nation

Elias Hubbard
June 26, 2017

Heller, a Republican who is up for re-election in 2018, is the Democrats' top target in the upcoming cycle. The legislation would phase out federal funding for Medicaid expansion - now covering about 11 million people in 31 states - beginning in 2020, and shift more of those costs back to states.

Schumer says Democrats have made clear they would be willing to work with Republicans to pass a Senate bill if they agree to drop a repeal of the Affordable Care Act and instead work to improve it.

"Only in Washington is giving more each year considered a cut", said Barrasso, who also said the new health care plan will provide subsidies for insurance for those who don't qualify for Medicaid.

But Republicans only hold a 52-48 majority in the Senate, with all Democrats expected to vote against the Republican proposal.

At least two Republican senators on Sunday said that goal may prove too ambitious. They were Sens. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, Mike Lee of Utah, Rand Paul of Kentucky and Ted Cruz of Texas.

"We have a very good plan", Trump said in an interview broadcast in the United States on Sunday. On Friday, Heller also came out and said he will vote "no" on the bill as it now stands. Referring to Republican senators opposed to the bill, he said: "They want to get some points, I think they'll get some points".

While neither of Louisiana's Republican U.S. senators has committed to back the Senate GOP health care plan, advocacy groups seeking to keep the current Obamacare law intact have their focus squarely on only one of them: physician Bill Cassidy.

McConnell, eager to approve the legislation next week, indicated he was open to changes before it reaches the Senate floor, but he said it was time to act.

"What we can do is if they cannot get 50 votes, if they get to impasse, I've been telling leadership for months now I'll vote for a repeal", Paul said.

Clinton has been using Twitter to speak up against the health care bill over the past few days and her latest comments come as former President Barack Obama also took to social media to oppose the measure.

She said there are seven to eight other moderate Senate Republicans who share her deep concerns about Medicaid cuts.

And, if the Senate bill strips as many people's insurance as the House bill was projected to ― the CBO still has not yet scored the Senate bill, which was remained a secret up until this week ― it could mean a total of approximately 217,000 additional deaths over the next ten years. "We've got to fix the unmitigated disaster that is Obamacare".

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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