58 presumed dead in London tower blaze

Henrietta Strickland
June 19, 2017

Commander Stuart Cundy of the Metropolitan Police told a press conference the number may change but those believed to have died when the London tower block went up in flames is now in double figures.

The prime minister faced cries of "coward" and "shame on you" when she returned to the scene on Friday, having not met victims on her first visit.

People write tributes on a wall near to the Grenfell Tower block in Kensington, west London, yesterday following the June 14 fire at the residential building.

"This number 58 may change". They previously estimated the figure to be 30.

On Friday, angry protesters chanting "We want justice" stormed their way into the Kensington and Chelsea town hall to try to confront the leaders of the local council.

Residents of the destroyed tower said May was far too slow to visit the stricken community, that the building had been unsafe and that officials have failed to give enough information and support to those who have lost relatives and their homes.

Green said the government would pay for residents' legal representation at the inquiry and reiterated May's promise to rehouse those displaced by the fire within three weeks as close as possible to home. "As Prime Minister, I will be responsible for implementing its findings".

Commander Cundy said: "The time it is going to take us to undertake the search and recovery operation is going to be significant". "We're all angry, but of course none of us as angry as those who were directly affected".

She also claimed that the rescue centres maintained no formal records of those that had attended, and even said one hospital told her they were unable to say whether Mr Alhajali was there for confidentiality reasons.

On Friday evening, May was interviewed by Emily Maitlis on the BBC programme "Newsnight" where she sidestepped questions over whether she misread the public mood and anger over the Grenfell fire as well as what her personal response is - leading to more criticism of being called "robotic" and "cold".

Sixteen "very ordinary people" sat in Downing Street to bring their concerns to Theresa May in an "unprecedented" meeting and finally felt they were listened to, the Bishop of Kensington, Dr Graham Tomlin said.

Up to 600 people are believed to have lived in the 24-story tower, and many remain missing.

A solemn Queen Elizabeth II marked a minute of silence for victims of the London high-rise inferno at the start of a procession Saturday to mark her official birthday. This year, however, it is very hard to escape a very sombre national mood.

His statement came as Queen Elizabeth II reflected upon the sombre mood in the United Kingdom following tragedies in London and Manchester in recent weeks.

Such a direct message from the monarch is rare and indicated the extent of the turmoil in Britain. She said she has ordered daily progress reports on housing for those affected, and vowed the public inquiry into the disaster will be "open and transparent".

The fire has been a major test for Prime Minister Theresa May, whose Conservative Party is clinging to power after losing majority control of Parliament to a Labour surge in a snap election this month.

"Wallowing in the wash of a general election that stripped our prime minister of her authority on the very eve of European Union negotiations, neither common sense nor the evidence suggest she can re-establish public confidence", Parris wrote in the Times.

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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