Trudeau congratulates France's president-elect Macron on election win

Elias Hubbard
May 8, 2017

The result wasn't even close: Pollsters projected that Macron won 65 percent of the votes.

Brigitte Trogneux, wife of French presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron, speaks with media outside her house in Le Touquet, France, May 6, 2017.

Turnout looks to have been down (and blank votes up), suggesting that the voters were none too impressed by the choice they were required to make, an impression reinforced by one poll showing that 43 percent of Macron voters gave opposition to Marine Le Pen as their main reason for voting for him.

Last month the United States president posted a tweet in which he said the recent terrorist attack in Paris that left a police officer dead in the Champs-Élysée would have a "big effect" on the upcoming presidential election.

Donald Tusk left no doubt over who he supported in the French elections, congratulating the French on choosing "la Liberté, l'Egalité et la Fraternité" over tyranny and "fake news".

Getting to workThe last minute revelation that Macron's campaign organization "En Marche!" - meaning "Let's get to work!" - had been the target of a "massive and coordinated hacking operation" seems to have had little effect on the outcome. Macron's campaign swiftly confirmed it had been hacked some weeks ago and that at least some of the documents were genuine. This is the new normal. Key initiatives in the weeks to come will include a reform of the labor code created to make it easier for employers to hire and fire workers and simplification of the regulations affecting small businesses. Much will depend on the reaction of establishment forces that remain in control of significant parts of the public and private sectors.

But Franklin Templeton's head of European fixed income, David Zahn, said although French government bonds were likely to benefit short-term from Macron's win, they could underperform over the medium-term as focus shifts away from politics.

The fact that hackers went after Macron's campaign and dumped emails publicly just before the vote underscored the election's worldwide stakes. Her aggressive attacks and mocking tone during the televised debate on May 3 broke a long-established tradition of more genteel self-presentation in such events. German Chancellor Angela Merkel quickly expressed her pleasure over Macron's victory. Macron responded by accusing her of "permanently lying" about her own positions.

Clearly she could not count on enough of them to become their President.

If Le Pen wins, she plans to celebrate at the Chalet du Lac (sha-LAY doo lahk) in the Bois de Vincennes (bu-AH de vin-SEN), a vast park on Paris' eastern edge.

Separately, Philippot said on TF1 television: "The National Front is going to evolve, it's going to use this rallying energy".

Jean-François Jalkh stepped down from his post within 24 hours, but the damage was done.

While Marine Le Pen had been likened to populist US President Donald Trump, the American leader was quick to congratulate her rival on Twitter.

Preliminary results from France confirm what markets were expecting: a decisive loss for Le Pen.

Global financial markets and France's neighbors are watching carefully. Both Macron and Le Pen upended that right-left tradition.

The fate of the European Union may hang in the balance as France's 47 million voters decide whether to risk handing the presidency to Le Pen, who dreams of quitting the bloc and its common currency, or to play it safer with Macron, an unabashed pro-European who wants to strengthen the EU.

"Victory for Macron, for France, the European Union, & the world", Hillary Clinton wrote on Twitter.

The handover of power takes place next weekend. On June 11, the first round will feature candidates from multiple parties.

At least one opinion poll published in the run-up to the second round has indicated that the majority he needs could be within reach.

"I warmly congratulate Emmanuel Macron on his success and I look forward to working with him on a wide range of shared priorities", she said.

Other reports by Click Lancashire

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